London's four penny coffin house

London's coffin house in Burne street.  Circa 1900.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/84/Fourpence_coffin.jpg/220px-Fourpence_coffin.jpg

These rows of "coffins" were the men's sleeping quarters in London's Burne Street hostel. Circa 1900

The four penny coffin or coffin house was one of the first homeless shelters created for the people of central London. It was operated by the Salvation Army during the late 19th and early 20th centuries to provide comfort and aid to its destitute clients.

 

The Salvation Army operated other homeless shelters in the area. These shelters charged the clients different amounts depending on the amenities offered. At the low end was a penny sit-up, where a homeless client could get food and shelter from the cold in exchange for a penny. He was allowed to sit on a bench all night, but was not allowed to sleep. For an additional penny, there was the "two penny hangover". It was like a penny sit-up except that a rope was placed in front of the bench. The client was allowed to sleep when he leaned on (or hung over) the rope during the night. He was not allowed to lie down flat on his back and sleep.

For four pennies, a homeless client could stay at a coffin house. He received food and shelter. Moreover, he was allowed to lie down flat on his back and sleep in a coffin-shaped wooden box. The client was given a tarpaulin for covering. What made this unique is that it was the cheapest homeless shelter in London at that time that allowed its clients to lie down on their back and sleep. The Salvation Army also offered shelters that allowed its clients to sleep on a bed for a much higher price. Hence, the coffin house was popular because it offered an economical and mid-range solution for homeless clients looking for relief from the cold.

Compared with modern examples, this shelter is considered inadequate. It was, however, considered an inexpensive and compassionate attempt to deal with the relatively new problem of homelessness. This shelter provided relief from the harsh London winters and was viewed by many at the time as having the benefit of attracting new followers to Christianity.

 

 

Do what other don't, save a life. From all of us, Thank you.
Taste the difference between a cup of tea and saving a life. From all of us, Thank you.
With a couple of clicks and a few Euro you can save a life, if you don't do it it's because you don't want to. From all of us, Thank you.
To save a life there is no minimum, give what you want. From all of us, Thank you.
In this App Store you can save a life for 99 cents, but if you want to you can pay 1 Euro. From all of us, Thank you.
Save a life & look at yourself in the mirror, you'll see the difference. From all of us, Thank you.
You pay less saving a life than you would for a doughnut. From all of us, Thank you.
Give 1 Euro, win a fife. Who can give more?. From all of us, Thank you.
To give 1 or 2 Euro, you really don't need to think so much. From all of us, Thank you.
Every 5 seconds a child dies of hunger, you can't save them all but you can one. From all of us, Thank you.
To save a child from certain death by starvation, is priceless. You can do it here for a couple of Euros. From all of us, Thank you.
MEDICOS SIN FRONTERAS - QUIERO HACER UNA DONACIÓN Save the Children Amnistia Internacional

CRUZ ROJA Española - QUIERO HACER UNA DONACIÓN

wwf - QUIERO HACER UNA DONACIÓN